“Paddle or Fish” by Brad Wiegmann

 

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Brad Wiegmann, outdoor writer, sportsman, photographer and professional fishing guide took the time to review our Piranha and Predator Kayak Fishing Hand Paddles.    

Below is his review:

Nota, Nota, Nota going to do that again. I ended up the creek without a paddle. You think that’s funny don’t ya. Well, it’s not exactly what you think. See, I had my long 220 cm high-strength, air-grade 7075 T6 aluminum shaft with high impact ABS plastic blades, but the long, dangling vines and branches were making it impossible to use. So, I was literally up the creek without a paddle. At least one paddle that I could use to get around with and fish.

I am not the only kayak angler who faces this dilemma every time they go out fishing. The longer paddles of course are great for getting to where you are going to fish, but only seem to be in the way once you start fishing. That’s what Ed Halm, owner of Backwater Paddles discovered. His solution was to design a hand paddle that anglers could use to control their kayak while fishing. Interestingly, Halm not only designed and built one hand paddle, but two: Piranha and Predator. Both are designed for anglers when kayak fishing, but built different to accommodate what kayak the angler is fishing out of. The Piranha weighs 7-ounces with a blade size of 5” x 12” and total length of 19-inches. Piranha’s longer length makes it ideal for anglers fishing from sit-on-top kayaks. The Predator weighs 6-ounces with a blade size of 6” x 9” and total length of 15-inches.  Predator’s shorter length makes it perfect for anglers fishing from sit-in kayaks. Both are waterproof and have a wooden blade and handle. Backwater Paddles (www.backwaterpaddles.com) are made in the U.S.A. and 100% guaranteed against breakage.

Nota, Nota, Nota going to do that again. I ended up the creek without a paddle. You think that’s funny don’t ya. Well, it’s not exactly what you think. See, I had my long 220 cm high-strength, air-grade 7075 T6 aluminum shaft with high impact ABS plastic blades, but the long, dangling vines and branches were making it impossible to use. So, I was literally up the creek without a paddle. At least one paddle that I could use to get around with and fish.

Brad checking out the Predator and Piranha Kayak Fishing Hand Paddles

I am not the only kayak angler who faces this dilemma every time they go out fishing. The longer paddles of course are great for getting to where you are going to fish, but only seem to be in the way once you start fishing. That’s what Ed Halm, owner of Backwater Paddles discovered. His solution was to design a hand paddle that anglers could use to control their kayak while fishing. Interestingly, Halm not only designed and built one hand paddle, but two: Piranha and Predator. Both are designed for anglers when kayak fishing, but built different to accommodate what kayak the angler is fishing out of. The Piranha weighs 7-ounces with a blade size of 5” x 12” and total length of 19-inches. Piranha’s longer length makes it ideal for anglers fishing from sit-on-top kayaks. The Predator weighs 6-ounces with a blade size of 6” x 9” and total length of 15-inches.  Predator’s shorter length makes it perfect for anglers fishing from sit-in kayaks. Both are waterproof and have a wooden blade and handle. Backwater Paddles (www.backwaterpaddles.com) are made in the U.S.A. and 100% guaranteed against breakage.

Hand paddles can be used by anglers, hunters, or even photographers to control their kayaks. “Some of the benefits to using a hand paddle include being able to control the kayak with one hand so you can fish with the other and not have to lay down your fishing pole; you can also use them in skinny water or around thick cover and brush like mangrove trees. The hook also allows anglers to pull themselves next to docks, grab trees, snag lines, and maneuver their kayaks,” explain Halm. The Backwater Paddles come with a wrist strap that anglers can put around their wrist to keep from dropping or losing it. Being shorter in length than a standard two bladed paddle, anglers can store them inside their boat or hook them onto the side. It’s common to see anglers using the hand paddles in skinny water. The blade length allows the angler to control the kayak and stalk fish effortlessly; however hand paddles shouldn’t be overlooked in moving water. “Hand paddles are great in moving water like rivers and streams. They can be used to control your drift and flow with the current.; in addition to paddling yourself to a shallow spot, eddy, or like a rudder to guide the kayak,” said Halm.

 Are you going out fishing from a kayak? Would you like to fish more than paddling trying to control your kayak? When it comes to fishing more than paddling you are better off with a hand paddle. The smaller compact paddles can be used to maneuver your kayak with little effort making it easier to sneak up on fish in shallow water. Plus they can be used as a backup in case your longer paddle breaks. You won’t want to find yourself up a creek without a paddle would ya?

Author:  Brad Wiegmann

We appreciate your time and consideration Brad! 

Ed Halm

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